Home > Get Dressed For Battle > Armour

Viking Spangenhelm 1 - 16 Gauge & 3mm Nasal

Product Code: AB0400
Brand: Get Dressed For Battle
£83.00
More Information
Mainstays of the Viking era, Spangenhelms are characterised by their construction, whereby steel strips (spangen) are used to join the steel plates of the cap. For strength and safety, the cap of our reconstruction is virtually one-piece, comprised of two halves, welded together along a back to front centre line. Steel rivets are used to attach the overlying banding and 3mm. medium-flare nose-guard (nasal).
Crafted in 16 gauge steel with full leather liner and chin strap.
Close attention to quality is a top priority in every piece, and this item is shipped to you pre-oiled for protection.

This is an excellent item for re-enactment and would make a great addition to any collection


We also have a helmet stand for this item as pictured which is usually £19- but if purchased with the helmet is only £15-

Key Features:

16 Gauge Steel
Adjustable Leather Interior With Chin Strap
Excellent Item For Re-enactment
Product Weight 5 1/2.lb


History
The Spangenhelm was a popular European war combat helmet design of the Early Middle Ages. The name is of German origin. Spangen refers to the metal strips that form the framework for the helmet and could be translated as clips, and -helm simply means helmet. The strips connect three to six steel or bronze plates. The frame takes a conical design that curves with the shape of the head and culminates in a point. The front of the helmet may include a nose protector (a nasal). Older spangenhelms often include cheek flaps made from metal or leather. Spangenhelms may incorporate mail as neck protection, thus forming a partial aventail. Some spangenhelms include eye protection in a shape that resembles modern eyeglass frames. Other spangenhelms include a full face mask. The spangenhelm originated in Central Asia and Ancient Persia, arriving in Europe by way of what is now southern Russia and Ukraine, spread by nomadic Iranian tribes such as the Scythians and Sarmatians who lived among the the Eursian steppes. By the 6th century it was the most common helmet design in Europe and in popular use throughout the Middle East. It remained in use at least as late as the 9th century. The spangenhelm was an effective protection that was relatively easy to produce. Weakness of the design were its partial head protection and its jointed construction. It was replaced by similarly shaped helmets made with one-piece skulls (nasal helms), kettle hats and eventually the Great helm or casque.
 
Customer Reviews

Customer Reviews
Write an online review and share your thoughts with other shoppers!